A Rode Well Traveled: Marking Your Ground Tackle

Anchoring is almost always fun and often challenging (we recently had an anchoring adventure in Desolation Sound). Beside learning key techniques related to placement and holding capabilities, it’s critically important for boaters to understand the ratios (scope) of anchor rode (chain or line) to water depth.

There are lots of online resources and videos to guide boaters and teach them some of the best techniques for the various types of anchoring that can be performed. Anchor manufacturers also provide useful resources. A small list of some of these guides will appear at the end of this post.

Instead of discussing holding capabilities and scope, this post, instead, will share our experience painting our anchor line. While there are electromechanical chain counting systems, a simpler visual system sometimes works just as well and is certainly more affordable.

Bring Out Your Chain

The first step was to pull out all the chain from the chain locker. I used two tarps to protect the bow deck and the side of the boat. The weight of the chain would serve to keep both of them in place. I recommend using work glove while handling your chain. As a practice, I wear them whenever dealing with ground tackle and, especially, the windlass.

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While I was pulling out chain I had someone on the dock, next to the boat, start collecting the chain.

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A dock line was used to secure the anchor end of the chain, which would remain on the bow. I used a tape measure to determine the first 30 feet of the chain, starting with the anchor swivel connected to the anchor.

Measuring and Marking

One we had some chain on the dock some painter’s tape was used to mark the first 30 foot position. You can decide to mark your chain in whatever lengths you feel are appropriate. A vast majority of our anchoring is in Cozy Cove near Carillon Point or in Andrews Bay next to Seward Park. For whatever reason, we’re always calculating our scope and chain length in 30 foot sections – so that’s how we measured things out.

IMG_4178Our dock has ten foot sections which makes measuring our 30 foot sections super easy. After three dock sections we’d turn our chain, wrap it around and pull back to our starting point.

Once our chain was laid out it became a relatively simple matter of protecting the dock and boat and then, simply, applying some marine paint. We selected red because we thought it would be the easiest to see.

IMG_4181Almost any paint brand will work. We selected a can of red Moeller spray paint that we purchased at Fisheries Supply. It was designed for marine applications. It’s likely that you’ll have to refresh your markings every few years depending upon how often your chain is exposed to the windlass and water.

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The whole marking job took about 90 minutes, which included time for the paint to dry. We definitely measured multiple times before applying paint. Our marks ended up being at the 30′, 60′ 90′, 120′, 150′ and 180′ positions. For all chain rode in the Pacific NW the scope is typically 3:1 allowing us to, conceivably, anchor in depths up to 60 feet.

While some people use different patterns to designate the different length segments, all our markings were the same – big red areas about a foot or so in length designed to be easily seen as anchor chain is let out. We were confident that we could keep track of our six marks instead of trying to decipher some dash-dot or varying color pattern.

Anchoring Resources

Technology and Tools for Anchoring

 

 

This entry was posted in Onboard, Safety, Tools, Uncategorized and tagged , , by David. Bookmark the permalink.

About David

David is a Seattle-based technology entrepreneur. He's created several successful companies. He's an avid boater and enjoys spending time with his wife, daughter and Australian Shepherd aboard MV KAYLA in Lake Washington and Puget Sound. He's also a volunteer Firefighter / EMT and enjoys sharing his knowledge of safety and life-saving skills with fellow boaters.

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